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Greatest Quarterbacks of All-Time: 1-10

1. Tom Brady – Patriots (2000 – Present)

tom brady
Regular Season: 160 Wins – 47 Losses (.773) – #3
Playoffs: 22-9 (.724)
6 AFC Championships
4 Super Bowl Championships
2 MVP’s
3 SB MVP’s
10 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
53,258 YP – 392 TD – 143 Int – 63.5%
Playoff Statistics
7,345 YP – 53 TD – 26 Int – 62.9%
There are three criteria that hold nearly equal weight when ranking the greatest quarterbacks of all-time:  regular season statistics, playoff statistics, and arguably the most important, championships.The greatest of all-time will be at the top of, or close to the top of all categories.
It is hard to claim that you are the #1 all-time quarterback in history unless you have proven it year after year in the regular season and Tom Brady is statistically among the best ever across the board. He ranks fifth all-time in yards passing (53,258) and fifth in touchdown passes (392), he has an excellent 392 TD to 143 Int ratio, and a 63.5% lifetime completion rate. He has had monster seasons where he threw for 5,235 yards (2011) and he threw 50 TD’s (2007), which shows he can carry a team to a Super Bowl, not just manage a great team. Finally, Tom Brady is a winner in the regular season. He is #2 all-time in winning percentage (.773), and #3 in all-time wins. Otto Graham has a better winning percentage at .861, but 48 wins were in the AFFC, which aren’t included by the NFL and thus get a smaller weight of value, but either way Brady has 55 more wins and an amazing winning percentage himself.
The number two criteria (almost equally weighted with career statistics) is the post season performances of the quarterback. While Tom Brady is in top five greatest quarterbacks all-time statistically, he is #1 all-time when looking at all facets of playoff performances. Brady has thrown for the most yards (7,345) and most touchdowns (53) in playoff history. Brady also wins posting a record 21 wins. Brady has six Conference Championships, four Super Bowl Championships, and three Super Bowl MVP’s, all tops or ties for tops in NFL history. Bart Starr does have a better playoff winning percentage at .900 (9-1), but Brady has more than doubles his wins at 21. Bradshaw has less wins (14) and a lower percentage (.737). He beats #2 Joe Montana in every category mentioned.
Brady adds two NFL MVP’s and ten Pro Bowls to his resume leaving only the “intangibles” to discuss. While Brady really wasn’t revolutionary in any way like Otto Graham, Johnny Unitas, or Joe Montana, “The Comeback Kid” certainly was clutch and showed great leadership throughout his career. He has the most 4th quarter game-winning drives in the playoffs with nine and is 3rd best all-time with 35 come from behind victories.
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POSITIVE
Tom Brady isn’t done yet.
NEGATIVE
With the given criteria, not much, that’s why he’s #1, but Brady wasn’t particularly revolutionary in anyway. He didn’t bring anything new to the game.  Deflate-gate is a negative, but there wasn’t enough evidence to have significance .
CONSIDER THIS
Tom Brady has played almost two seasons (29 games) worth of football in the post season football and has been brilliant for the most part while doing so.

2. Joe Montana – 49ers, Chiefs (1979 – 1994)

Joe Montana
Regular Season: 117 Wins – 47 Losses (.713) – #8
Playoffs: 16-7 (.696)
4 NFC Championships
4 Super Bowl Championships
2 MVP’s
3 SB MVP’s
8 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
40,051 YP – 273 TD – 119 Int – 63.2%
Playoff Statistics
5,772 YP – 45 TD – 21 Int – 62.7%
Brady at #1 and Montana at #2 starts the never ending debate. Joe Montana is the only other quarterback in Brady’s tier which means we can consider them equals, but we have to pick one and using the stated criteria, and our choice is Brady.
Many who argue for Montana state that they were in different era’s and this is true, but Brady compensates with better statistics. Some argue that Joe Montana was a revolutionary quarterback and thus should be above Brady. His coach Bill Walsh gets much of that credit, not to mention Dan Fouts and Ken Anderson who were running a similar offenses with success before Montana. Nevertheless, Joe Montana and Bill Walsh ran a different and better offense and it was theirs that won four Super Bowls and it was theirs that every team try to emulate in some way.
Another argument made for Montana at #1 states that Montana is 4-0 in the Super Bowl and Brady is 4-2 and this gives Montana the edge over Brady. There is zero credit for going 1-0, 2-0, 3-0, or 4-0 in the Super Bowl with the given criteria. The criteria that matters is that Brady and Montana both played well in their Super Bowls and that they both won four. The criteria doesn’t ask how many championship games did a quarterback lose, or how many divisional playoffs did he lose, and so on. The point is winning a NFC or AFC Championship is a good thing and the more your win, the better you are.
Each of these three points are considered and while it might be enough to call it a tie, we have to pick one, and due to beating Montana across the board in statistics, regular season wins, playoff wins, conference championships, Tom Brady is #1.
With that out of the way, there is no debate that Joe Montana was an incredible quarterback and he was the quarterback who had the most overall success with the revolutionary west coast offense and it was he and Bill Walsh, not Fouts and Coryell, nor Gregg and Anderson who won four championships and took the NFL into a new era of quarterbacking and a new way to measure quarterbacks.
Montana is one of the great clutch-time quarterbacks to ever play the game. “Joe Cool’s” comebacks include a last minute Super Bowl win and the 49ers first trip to the Super Bowl with “The Catch”. His Super Bowl stats say everything you need to know about Joe Montana: 1,142 YP – 11 TD’s – 0 Int and of course the 4-0 record.
There are valid arguments for Montana at #1, but in addition to the conference championships, Montana never put up 4,000 yards, Brady put up 5,000, Brady will finish with at least 15,000 more yards passing, and well over 100 more touchdown passes than Montana.
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POSITIVE
Joe Montana threw for 1,142 yards, 11 touchdowns, 0 interceptions, and completed 68.0% of his passes in four Super Bowls and he also rushed for 105 yards and two touchdowns.
NEGATIVE
Really none, but Joe Montana did have some amazing receivers throughout his career, including the greatest, Jerry Rice. That makes being great a little easier.
CONSIDER THIS
Every team in the NFL uses some form of Joe Montana’s and Bill Walsh’s West Coast Offense.

3. Peyton Manning – Colts, Broncos (1998 – Present)

peyton-manning
Regular Season: 141 Wins – 67 Losses (.699) – #2
Playoffs: 14-13 (.519)
4 AFC Championships
2 Super Bowl Championships
5 MVP’s
1 SB MVP
14 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
69,691 YP – 530 TD – 234 Int – 65.5%
Playoff Statistics
6,800 YP – 38 TD – 24 Int – 64%
Statistically Peyton Manning is the greatest quarterback of all-time and only #7 Brett Favre can even compare. An amazing 14 Pro Bowls is a testament to those amazing numbers and consistency. Throw in an NFL record five MVP’s and you have valid argument that Manning is the greatest quarterback ever.
Of course there is the post season and while Manning is hardly a failure in the post season, he simply was not dominate enough to compare to Brady or Montana. His post season numbers are actually very good, but not great, and his lifetime 11-13 mark in the playoffs falls way short of Tom Brady and Joe Montana.
Peyton Manning may have not been known for coming up clutch in the biggest game, but he was certainly known for coming up clutch at the end of close games posting 38 4th quarter comebacks (#1 all-time).
Manning did win a Super Bowl and three AFC Conference Championships, including one with a different team, so while his cupboard isn’t filled like Brady’s and Montana’s, it is hardly bare.
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POSITIVE
Winning five NFL MVP’s is  unreal.  Unitas and Favre are second with three each.
NEGATIVE
Peyton Manning has only thrown three touchdown passes in his three Super Bowl appearances.
CONSIDER THIS
Peyton Manning threw for over 4,000 yards 14 times. He is the greatest regular season quarterback of all-time.

 

4. John Elway – Broncos (1983 – 1998)

john-elway
Regular Season: 148 Wins – 82 Losses (.643) – #4
Playoffs: 14-7 (.666)
5 AFC Championships
2 Super Bowl Championships
1 MVP
1 SB MVP
9 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
51,475 YP – 300 TD – 226 Int – 56.9% – 3,407 YR – 33 TD’s
Playoff Statistics
4,964 YP – 27 TD – 21 Int – 54.5% – 461 YR – 6 TD’s
John Elway almost single-handedly lead the Broncos to three AFC Championships in four years only to be crushed by the NFC in all three Super Bowls and if this is where Elway’s story ended, he probably wouldn’t crack the top ten. Elway’s rise to number four came along with his new head coach Mike Shanahan West Coast Offense and the running skills of Terrel Davis. As a complete team the Broncos returned to win back-to-back AFC Championships again, but this time they added back-to-back Super Bowl Championships, an accomplishment that only a few quarterbacks have done.
John Elway was no stranger to clutch plays and comebacks including his most famous comeback against the Browns which is still called, “The Drive”. Overall Elway ranks number three behind Peyton Manning and Dan Marino for most 4th quarter comebacks.
While Elway’s statistics do not compare very well to the top three, his game was not that of the classic drop back style (at least not for most of his career) of the top three. Elway was definitely a gunslinger who made things happen out of necessity. He did still manage to eclipse 50,000 yards passing (6th overall), threw for 300 TD’s (7th overall), and rushed for 3,407 yards (7th overall).
In the end, John Elway’s  five AFC Championships and back-to-back Super Bowl wins gets him into the argument as the greatest quarterback ever.  Combine that with his clutch play and his ability to keep plays alive, similar to Fran Tarkenton, and it can be argued that Elway was much better than his stats show.  Unfortunately we can not magically project better stats upon him and therefore he comes in at #4.
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POSITIVE
John Elway has five conference championships. Only Tom Brady and Bart Starr have similar accomplishments.
NEGATIVE
In John Elway’s three Super Bowl losses he completed under 46% of his passes, and threw just 2 TD’s’ against 6 Int.
CONSIDER THIS
John Elway has five conference championships. Only Tom Brady and Bart Starr have similar accomplishments.

 

5. Johnny Unitas – Colts, Chargers (1956-1973)

Johnny-unitas
Regular Season: 118 Wins – 64 Losses (.645) – #7
Playoffs: 6-2 (.750)
1 AFC Championship
1 Super Bowl Championship – 2 NFL Championships
3 MVP’s
10 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
40,239 YP – 280 TD – 253 Int – 54.6%
Playoff Statistics
1,663 YP – 7 TD – 10 Int – 53.1%
Arguably the first great “modern” quarterback, decades before the time of the “modern” quarterback due to his incredible statistics, championships, and leadership. His resume includes everything you want to see in the greatest ever including three NFL MVP’s and three Championships (One Super Bowl and two NFL Championships).
When Unitas retired he had set most passing records and was the first ever 40,000 yard quarterback in NFL history. He still ranks 9th all-time with 280 touchdown passes, which is amazing considering the 12 and 14 game schedules and the lack of passing in his time.
Unitas has many intangibles to make him the one of the greatest.  He was the Beatles of quarterbacks. He was the first or the best at so many things in his career it is impossible to mention them all. But one thing that can’t be measured is leadership and Unitas was one of the great team leaders ever.  He was the star in the 1958 NFL Championship Game, which is called “The Greatest Game Ever Played”.  It really was one of the most important games in NFL history.  The NFL’s popularity exploded and by the mid-1960s, professional football became the nation’s favorite sport to watch on tv. The game also led to the first-ever “two-minute” offense engineered by Unitas.
So why isn’t he higher? There are a couple of holes in the arguments for Unitas at #1 – #4.  First, the very Super Bowl he gets credit for was the worst offensive Super Bowl in history.  Unitas was 3 of 9 for 88 yards, 1 TD and 2 Int (75 yards coming in 1 play).  He was knocked out of the game and Earl Morall actually led them from behind to tie the game in the 4th quarter and eventually a win in overtime.  Really this is the biggest flaw in Unitas’s game: He wasn’t a great overall quarterback in the playoffs. In fact, he is statistically the worst playoff quarterback in the top ten.  Let that sink in for a moment.  He wasn’t awful (1,663 yards, 7 TD’s, 10 Int), but he was far from…great.
Realizing statistics do not show everything and it was a different era, it won’t knock him out of the top five, but it prevents him from going any higher.
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POSITIVE
Unitas’s three NFL MVP’s was the record for 30 years until Brett Farve tied it and a total of 42 years until Peyton Manning won his fourth in 2009.
NEGATIVE
If the playoffs are the highest measure of greatness, Unitas has a mixed resume.
CONSIDER THIS
In a poll conducted by the NFL in 1969, Johnny Unitas was named the league’s greatest player of its first 50 years. That gives you an insight into the game back then, and that matters.
6. Otto Graham – Browns (1946-1955)
otto graham
Regular Season: 57 Wins – 13 Losses (.802) – #72105-17 (.861)*  *with AAFC
Playoffs: 9-3 (.696)
3 NFL Championships – 4 AAFC Championships
3 MVP’s – 2 AAFC MVP’s
5 Pro Bowls – 3 AAFC All-Pro
Regular Season Statistics
23,584 YP – 174 TD – 135 Int – 55.8% – 888 YR – 44 TD
Playoff Statistics
2,101 YP – 14 TD – 17 Int – 53% – 359 YR – 6 TD
When it comes to judging and comparing pre-sixities quarterbacks or at least pre-Unitas quarterbacks, it is very difficult and you are going to anger some fans. The passing game was obviously so different back then and you can’t really compare to today without “imagining”. This is where the old-time quarterbacks lose out. The modern quarterbacks have a huge advantage statistically, but that is the very reason they are better. As good as any quarterback was,we cannot prove they would have been as good or better than Tom Brady. You can project more games, but everything cannot simply multiplied out to make all eras equal. The criteria does allow more credit to quarterbacks who were among the best of their era and of course revolutionary quarterbacks of which, Otto Graham was both.
Otto Graham is considered by many to be the greatest quarterback ever and when he retired he was. The game has changed a lot since he played, and a lot due to him. He really is, even by today’s standards the prototypical quarterback: Winner, leader, strong arm, strong and mobile. Most who study the history of the game know he should be somewhere in the top ten.
The first thing that comes to mind when thinking about Otto Graham is winning.  A .861 winning percentage and seven championships in ten seasons say it all. (four of those championships came in the AAFC, which basically had two to three teams that were competitive). When Otto Graham and the Browns did face the NFL for the NFL Championship, they did continue to win, so that legitimizes his four AAFC Championship to a certain degree. But the fact remains, championships back even before the seventies were easier to attain and dynasties were much easier to maintain.  The pre-division and pre-Super Bowl days the team who won a division went to the NFL Championship, no playoffs.
Otto Graham was more than championships, he could throw the ball. He threw for  23,584 yards, 174 TD and 135 Int.  His numbers are better than most pre-1979 quarterbacks. One of the most overlooked aspects of Graham’s game is his mobility and toughness which helped him evade many the sack and got him 44 touchdowns.
Much like Bill Walsh and Joe Montana ran the West Coast Offense to perfection in the eighties, together coach Paul Brown and Otto Graham ran and equally successful, early form of the West Coast Offense.  Graham was innovative and revolutionary for his time.
Two key factors keep Otto Graham out of the top five.  One is his average (for the era) playoff stats (14 TD 17 Int – 53%) and his lack of competition in the AAFC. There weren’t playoffs unless a tie, so his playoff stats are low, but also just “good” for the ERA, particularly when looking at the NFL stats.  The fact is the NFL doesn’t count the AAFC stats, even though we did above. He threw for 13,499 yards, 88 TD’s and 94 Int. in the NFL. Still good for the time, but not top five all-time good even for the amount of years he played in NFL and the era.
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POSITIVE
Graham played ten professional seasons and was the league MVP in five of them.
NEGATIVE
With only six NFL seasons Graham simply cannot compare with certain quarterbacks with longer careers.
CONSIDER THIS
In his ten seasons Otto Graham lead the Cleveland Browns to 10 division or league crowns and won seven championships.

 

7. Brett Favre – Falcons, Packers, Jets, Vikings (1991-2010)

brett-favre
Regular Season: 186 Wins – 112 Losses (.624) – #1
Playoffs: 13-11 (.542)
2 NFC Championships
1 Super Bowl Championship
3 MVP’s
11 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
71,838 YP – 508 TD – 336 Int – 62%
Playoff Statistics
5,855 YP – 44 TD – 30 Int – 60.8%
Brett Favre is a lot like John Elway in the fact that he was a gunslinger who made plays when nothing was there and this can account for some sloppy stats from time-to-time. But he lead many average Packer teams to the playoffs with his amazing play-making ability. On the other hand, that gunslinger mentality also lead him to throw more interceptions (336) than any other quarterback in history.
Favre is arguably, along with Peyton Manning, the greatest statistical quarterback to ever play professional football. Over 70,000 yards and 500 touchdowns is ridiculous. His longevity and good health serve him well in the all-time rankings. Futhermore, Brett Favre’s three MVP’s and eleven Pro Bowls attest to his amazing statistics, consistency, and longevity.
Favre was definitely one of those quarterbacks with “intangibles”. He wasn’t the fastest, nor the most mobile, but not too many quarterbacks could extend a play like Brett Favre. He is also one of the great 4th quarter quarterbacks of all-time (#6 overall) with his thirty 4th quarter comebacks.
While Brett Favre never got the coveted 2nd championship that might have ascended him to the top five, he did manage to win thirteen playoff games, two NFC Championships, and one Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers.
In the end, if the stats don’t do it for you, watch some film on Brett Favre and that should.
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POSITIVE
Brett Favre is one of the most entertaining quarterbacks to watch play. Put on some film and watch one of the greats ever do his magic.
NEGATIVE
336 interceptions in the regular season and another 30 interceptions in the playoffs cost his teams a lot of games.
CONSIDER THIS
One of Favre’s most unbelievable records is his 297 consecutive starts which is tops for any position and a testament of his consistency.

 

8. Roger Staubach – Cowboys (1969-1979)
Roger-Staubach
Regular Season: 84 Wins – 29 Losses (.746) – #32
Playoffs: 11-6 (.647)
4 NFC Championships
2 Super Bowl Championships
1 SB MVP
6 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
22,700 YP – 153 TD – 109 Int – 57% – 2,264 YR – 20 TD’s
Playoff Statistics
2,791 YP – 24 TD – 19 Int – 54.4% – 432 YR
Roger Staubach is the first quarterback to get some extra consideration for less than spectacular lifetime stats due to a short career(though Otto Graham might fit into this category). Staubach sat out his first four seasons due to his Naval commitment, then retired at the top of his game due to concussions.
So how does one make it to #9 with only 22,700 yards passing regardless of time played? Looking at his numbers, Staubach basically played eight full seasons, yet his accomplishments are as good as most with long careers. In the eight seasons he went to six Pro Bowls, won four NFC Championships and won two Super Bowls.
Staubach was revolutionary at his position.  He and Tom Laundry had opposite offensive visions, but much like Brown and Graham did, they managed to combine them into what many look at as the model modern quarterback: A leader, accurate passer, strong arm, mobile, and throws from the run. Like John Elway, Staubach was famed for his play making mobility.  His lifetime completion rate of 57% in the seventies with a scrambling quarterback is amazing (consider John Elway’s was 56.9% in the eighties and nineties).
A full career from Roger Staubach would have likely included more championships, clearly more stats, and shoe-in to compete with Tom Brady and Joe Montana for the title of Greatest Quarterback of All-Time.  But just as older era quarterbacks like Joe Montana or Otto Graham do not get 100% inflation of their stats to modern stats, Staubach does not get his stats multiplied out.  With Roger Staubach it is about his accomplishments in his short time period: .746 winning percentage, 11-6 playoff record, good playoff stats, four NFC Championships, two Super Bowls, and six Pro Bowls.  Those numbers are right there with the top ten quarterbacks.
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POSITIVE
Roger the dodger, aka Captain America had to be seen and felt to appreciate fully.  He was everything his team wanted as a leader and everything the NFL of the seventies loved to see as one of its stars.
NEGATIVE
Losing to Terry Bradshaw and the Pittsburgh Steelers twice by a total of eight points will always slightly tarnish his legacy.
CONSIDER THIS
In Roger Staubach’s final season (1979) he threw for 3,586 yards, 27 TD’s, both career highs after having career highs in 1978.  He also won the passing title each of his lat two seasons.

 

9. Dan Marino – Dolphins (1983-1999)

Dan Marino
Regular Season: 147 Wins – 93 Losses (.613) – #5
Playoffs: 8-10 (.444)
1 AFC Championships
1 MVP
9 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
61,361 YP – 420 TD – 252 Int – 59.4%
Playoff Statistics
4,510 YP – 32 TD 24 Int – 56%
Marino could be the greatest quarterback to ever play. His quick release, strong arm, and mobile feet made him virtually unstoppable. He is one of the greatest fourth quarter quarterbacks in history (#2 all-time with 36 comebacks). But you have to have standards when talking about the greatest and winning championships is one of them.
Dan Marino has a .613 all-time winning percentage, which is very good, but it doesn’t rank in the top ten. He has a losing playoff record (8-10), and his Super Bowl performance (29/50 309 YP 1 TD – 2 Int) was sub par and the Dolphins lost bad.
With that said, Marino carried many of the average Dolphin teams into the playoffs and Marino actually played well himself overall in the playoffs. Really, an 8-10 record with some average teams isn’t bad and neither is 4,510 yards passing, 32 TD’s, and 24 Int. This comes down to a case where if you played for a bad team (though they did have good receivers), you’re not going to be one of the greatest quarterbacks (see Archie Manning).  Yet here is Marino at #9, and that’s because he was that good.
Marino led his team to the Super Bowls a rookie and in his second year he smashed Dan Fouts NFL record for passing yards by throwing for 5,048 yards, the first ever to break the 5,000 yard-barrier.  Amazing considering this is still before the next wave of rule changes that opened the gate for 5,000 yard passers like Drew Brees.
The knock on Marino that he never won a championship, is legitimate and prevents him from being in the top five, but Dan Marino was a winner, he took teams on his back to the playoffs and played well in them. In the end, Dan Marino is the #1 QB of all-time without a championship and that says something considering the quarterbacks not yet ranked with multiple championships.
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POSITIVE
Dan Marino passed for 3,000 yards or more in a season thirteen times in his career which includes the six 4,000-yard seasons and one 5,000 yard season.
NEGATIVE
Marino is 8th all-time with 252 interceptions.
CONSIDER THIS
The very mobile Fran Tarkenton was sacked four more times in his career than Dan Marino and they didn’t count sacks for his first eight years of Tarkenton’s career.  A testament to Marino’s quick release and deceiving mobility.

 

10. Steve Young – Bucs, 49ers (1985-1999)

steve young
Regular Season: 94 Wins – 49 Losses (.657)  – #19
Playoffs: 8-6 (.571)
1 NFC Championship
1 Super Bowl Championship
2 MVP’s
1 SB MVP
7 Pro Bowls
Regular Season Statistics
33,124 YP – 232 TD’s – 107 Int – 64.3% – 4,239 YR – 43 TD’s
Playoff Statistics
3,326 YP – 20 TD – 13 Int – 62% – 594 YR – 8 TD’s
Steve Young is the second quarterback to be given a consideration doubt his lower than great career stats for his era. Steve Young started in the USFL, then went to Tampa Bay, and was acquired by the 49ers where he sat on the bench behind the #2 all-time greatest quarterback, Joe Montana. That was a total of six season before he started ten games in 1991.
When you consider that he was the full-time starter for just seven season in his career and he went to the Pro Bowl every one of those seasons was the NFL MVP in two of them, you realize how good he was when he played.
Steve Young was one of the most accurate quarterbacks completing over 67% of his passes in six of those seven seasons he won a remarkable six passing titles in the seven years.
All of this isn’t even talking about Steve Young as one of the greatest running quarterbacks in history.  He rushed for over 4,000 yards and 43 TD’s in his career and many of these runs were running back like, not avoiding tackles.  Not only could he run, he avoided sacks, and was great throwing on the run.
Young did struggle a bit in the playoffs, but still played well (particularly in the Super Bowl), just not up to his standards. Even so, Steve Young, like Roger Staubach, could have been the greatest ever with a longer career, but he did not, and as the criteria states, longevity wins out.
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POSITIVE
In his only Super Bowl appearance as a starter Steve Young went 24 of 36 for 325 yards with a Super Bowl record six touchdown passes. He also rushed five times for 49 yards.
NEGATIVE
If you discount the 1994 playoffs, where Steve Young dominated by throwing nine touchdowns and zero interceptions, he has an eleven-to-thirteen touchdown-to-interception ratio which is bad for any era in the playoffs.
CONSIDER THIS
Steve Young (the greatest running quarterback of his time) didn’t throw a pass in the 2000’s, yet he is the 4th ranked passing quarterback of all-time with a 96.8 passer rating.  The top three, (Aaron Rodgers (106.0), Tony Romo (97.6), and Peyton Manning (97.5), all played most of the careers after rule changes that helped the passing game.

 

Next: Greatest Quarterbacks 11-20

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3 comments

  1. Anonymous

    !GO CHEIFS!!!!!!!

  2. Cowboys Fan

    Bart Starr was better than everyone on this list.

  3. REALIST

    If you want to compare apples to apples, lets look at one important fact. Everyone on this list has perennial All-Star running backs on their team. Starr had Horning, Montana had Craig, Manning had Dickerson and then Davis. By contrast, Tom Brady has never had a top tier running back to take the pressure off of him. Bradshaw had Franco Harris, Staubach had Calvin Hill, Aikman had Emmit Smith, Johhny Unitas had Alan Ameche, only Brady has consistently won without a strong running game. That alone sets him apart. Many NFL quarterbacks have played on teams without a strong running game. Only Brady has been a winner in that circumstance. I do not believe any other quarterback could have done so. So, get your facts straight Cowboys Fan and others who refuse to see the light. Brady is the greatest of all time, period.

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